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The Persistence of Inter-war Cleavages: Agrarian Inequality and the Left

By Jordi Domènech and Ignacio Sánchez-Cuenca Lipset and Rokkan famously claimed that the modern structure of cleavages was created in the interwar period, with the generalization of universal male suffrage and the advent of mass politics. They tried to explain the stability of Western party systems in the postwar era with the hypothesis that the … Continue reading The Persistence of Inter-war Cleavages: Agrarian Inequality and the Left

The Differential Incarceration of the Emancipated and the Enslaved

By Valentin Figueroa and Guadalupe Tuñón According to the US Department of Justice, the rate of imprisonment of African Americans was 938 per 100,000 persons in 2020—five times higher than the rate for whites. The mass incarceration of Black Americans has led activists and scholars to denounce the prison system as “slavery by another name” or … Continue reading The Differential Incarceration of the Emancipated and the Enslaved

Ethnic diversity as an outcome: the coevolution of state capacity and racial demography in Brazil

Ethnic diversity as an outcome: the coevolution of state capacity and racial demography in Brazil What are the effects of ethnic and racial diversity on local communities? With the rise of racial justice and immigration debates in the US and other countries, many politicians and policymakers feel compelled to take a strong and principled stance … Continue reading Ethnic diversity as an outcome: the coevolution of state capacity and racial demography in Brazil

Identity and State Capacity

Regular readers of Broadstreet will note that we write frequently about two topics: state capacity and identity. Previous posts delved into the intellectual history of the study of the state,  and how scholarship is evolving to incorporate new thinking around conceptual issues, measurement, political agency and agents, and the iterative nature of state-building. On identity, … Continue reading Identity and State Capacity

Calamities: A Call for a New Conceptual Toolkit

It’s been a week and I’m exhausted. I’ve been writing, posting, blogging, and petitioning, about what we as academics and my institution, LSE, could do to help Ukraine. The agony of the powerlessness of the first few days has now subsided for there are contours of concreteness now appearing, out of the blitz of emails, … Continue reading Calamities: A Call for a New Conceptual Toolkit

The Ghosts of History Haunt the Russia-Ukraine Crisis

On February 22, as the Ukraine crisis was unfolding and Russia was just hours away from invading its neighbor, Putin’s former Minister of Culture, Vladimir Medinsky, told journalists that Ukraine today has to be seen as “a historical phantom.”   Putin, he said, is taking “historic” decisions in line with “the spirit of the times.”  Five … Continue reading The Ghosts of History Haunt the Russia-Ukraine Crisis

On the Challenges of Interdisciplinary Collaboration

For those of us in fields that are inherently interdisciplinary – like HPE – the possibility of collaborating with colleagues in other fields is exciting. We like the idea of bringing additional dimensions to our research and working together with those who have different forms of expertise. But making this actually happen tends to be … Continue reading On the Challenges of Interdisciplinary Collaboration

Did Religion Facilitate Modern Growth? Or Was It a Stumbling Block?

By Lars Harhoff Andersen and Jeanet Sinding Bentzen One of the fathers of the social sciences, Max Weber, taught us that religion might have facilitated the transition towards modern growth and prosperity. The Protestant ethic supposedly spurred the development of capitalism by making hard work a deed cherished by God. In addition, monks were among … Continue reading Did Religion Facilitate Modern Growth? Or Was It a Stumbling Block?

The Protestant Road to Bureaucracy

Most state employees, like police officers, are rewarded with salaries, offered a career ladder of graded appointments with progressively higher remuneration, and follow standardized guidelines while being monitored by other employees above them in the public sector hierarchy. But there are exceptions to this. Sometimes states do not directly hire and monitor employees and instead … Continue reading The Protestant Road to Bureaucracy