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The study of political elites is gaining ground in HPE

Last year, I was chatting with a colleague about US politics and the uncertainty that the Trump presidency was generating domestically and internationally. Institutions, these formal and informal constraints on human behavior that we had learned so much about in graduate school, seemed weaker than anticipated even in the United States, a country that has … Continue reading The study of political elites is gaining ground in HPE

The Unintended Consequences of Nation-Making Institutions: People’s Houses and Civil Society Development in Turkey

By Tugba Bozcaga and Asli Cansunar During the 19th and 20th centuries, most new countries that broke away from a major empire or gained independence from a colonial power grappled with the challenge of creating new state-sponsored national attachments and loyalties. Usually, it was the state that formed the nation, not vice versa. Indeed, many states … Continue reading The Unintended Consequences of Nation-Making Institutions: People’s Houses and Civil Society Development in Turkey

How the Black Death Changed European History

By Daniel Gingerich and Jan Vogler The German city of Cologne and a tale of two pandemics Cologne in the western parts of Germany is best known for its magnificent Cathedral, the Kölner Dom, which is a world heritage site and attracts around six million visitors every year. In normal times, the city massively profits … Continue reading How the Black Death Changed European History

Introducing the Journal of Historical Political Economy

Over the last year, History Political Economy (HPE) has really taken off. If you're reading this, you have been following Broadstreet, which has been serving -- and building -- the HPE community since August 2020. Recently, my fellow Broadstreet editor, Jared Rubin, and I signed an agreement to edit the Oxford Handbook of Historical Political … Continue reading Introducing the Journal of Historical Political Economy

What Does ‘Historical’ Mean in Historical Political Economy?

By Daniel S. Smith and Thomas R. Gray Historically-oriented political science has risen to the fore as a dynamic genre in the discipline.  Within this growing literature, the historical political economy (HPE) research agenda is notable for its topical variety and methodological ecumenicism, drawing scholars together from across disciplinary divides. These qualities are all represented … Continue reading What Does ‘Historical’ Mean in Historical Political Economy?

State Power and the Power Law

Pavi had a great post recently on the different ways that historical political economists have conceptualized and measured state capacity. I want to follow up with a small point that doesn’t have anything directly to do with historical political economy, but that I believe is important for historical political economists and anyone else thinking about … Continue reading State Power and the Power Law

Does Climate Influence Culture? A Historical Perspective

People have long suspected that climate shapes attitudes and behavior. In The Spirit of the Laws (1748), French philosopher Baron de Montesquieu claimed that cold air increases blood flow to the heart. He expected this increased circulation to “produce various effects; for instance, a greater boldness, that is, more courage; a greater sense of superiority, … Continue reading Does Climate Influence Culture? A Historical Perspective