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French Peasants of 1848: The First “Deplorables”

One of the most salient features of recent electoral politics is the mutual incomprehension between urban progressives and rural dwellers. We saw this with the US presidential election of 2016—which gave us the term “deplorables”—as well as with the Brexit vote of the same year, and again with the US election of 2020.  Examples of this … Continue reading French Peasants of 1848: The First “Deplorables”

The Creation and Survival of Unreliable Data: Mexico’s 1921 Census

Those who have been following the ongoing political developments over the 2020 Census in the United States (not to mention recent posts on Broadstreet) will need no reminder that the process of counting the national population is complicated and political. Beyond the consequences for apportionment and federal transfers, the official census figures that emerge from … Continue reading The Creation and Survival of Unreliable Data: Mexico’s 1921 Census

A look back at the forgotten refugee crisis in Europe

“Your name and possibly your date of birth were recorded, and suddenly you became someone – a refugee with an identity card “A”, and you could apply for a certain level of support. Registering here in Friedland was the chance to start a new life, a real life in peace.” This is how Annelie Keil, … Continue reading A look back at the forgotten refugee crisis in Europe

Black Americans and the American Medical Establishment

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact on the Black community in the United States. As of now, 1 in 800 Black Americans has died of the virus, and it is the third leading cause of death for Black people.  Black people have a COVID-19 death rate that is nearly three times the White … Continue reading Black Americans and the American Medical Establishment

History, Culture, and the Measuring of Meaning Structures

One of the things that makes me so happy about having joined the Broadstreet crew is how often my fellow contributors write about topics that I—the lone sociologist of the bunch—get really excited about.  The obvious examples here are space and networks, which have been my main focus over my last couple of posts.  For … Continue reading History, Culture, and the Measuring of Meaning Structures

Pandemics are most definitely political!

by Leticia Arroyo Abad, Noel Maurer  As Alexandra Cirone noted in one of the first posts on this blog, “Pandemics are political.” Last month’s American election took place in the middle of a deadly pandemic that has killed roughly 280,000 people so far, amid a federal response that could charitably be called “botched.” Lives were … Continue reading Pandemics are most definitely political!