Moshe, Moiz, Moisis: Survival strategies of ethnoreligious minorities

By Vicky Fouka and Elias Dinas Thessaloniki, or Salonica, is a Greek seaport in the Northern Aegean. Nowadays second in population to the capital of Athens, it has historically been one of the largest and most vibrant cities of the Eastern Mediterranean, and a key trading center of the Ottoman Empire. For centuries, Muslims, Orthodox … Continue reading Moshe, Moiz, Moisis: Survival strategies of ethnoreligious minorities

How Social Science History Changes Our View of the Ancient World: A Conversation with Josiah Ober

Growing up in Greece and having a love for history, I more than once considered pursuing classical studies. After my undergraduate degree, I even enrolled for one semester in the department of History and Archaeology of the University of Athens. But attracted by the breadth and the claims to generalizability of social science studies, I … Continue reading How Social Science History Changes Our View of the Ancient World: A Conversation with Josiah Ober

Social change

In recent years, we have witnessed several shifts in social norms and publicly expressed attitudes. In 2018, public opinion on Black Lives Matter changed from mostly skeptical, to mostly supportive. This tendency continued until May 2020, when the murder of George Floyd massively boosted the movement’s popularity, driving changes in attitudes towards the police, and … Continue reading Social change

The Great Northward Migration and Social Transformation, Part II

The Great Migration reached its peak in the years between 1940 and 1970, when decadal outmigration rates from the US South among Blacks surpassed 10%. During the same period, the long-standing struggle of African Americans to end racial discrimination was consolidated into a massive social movement. The civil rights movement grew in intensity during the … Continue reading The Great Northward Migration and Social Transformation, Part II

The Great Northward Migration and Social Transformation, Part I

Sometime during the mid-1910s, African Americans, until then almost exclusively concentrated in the Southern United States, began a mass exodus. Pushed out by poverty, oppressive Jim Crow laws, violence and disenfranchisement, Southern Blacks sought a better life in growing cities of the Northeast and Midwest. There, the booming war industry was in need of labor, … Continue reading The Great Northward Migration and Social Transformation, Part I