Back to the Future? Battling Over the Speakership on the House Floor

By Jeffery A. Jenkins and Charles Stewart III The House of Representatives votes to elect its Speaker today—or, at least, that’s the plan. The problem is that the ostensible favorite, Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA), has yet to line up a majority of the House to win the position. Five conservative Republicans have announced their opposition … Continue reading Back to the Future? Battling Over the Speakership on the House Floor

The Direct Election of Senators and the Emergence of the Modern Presidency

The observation that presidents dominate US foreign policy is hardly novel. Around the world, executives generally have informational advantages in international affairs that translate into foreign policy autonomy (Baum and Potter 2015). Political institutions and practices make this doubly true in the United States. Indeed, presidential dominance in foreign policy is so widely accepted that … Continue reading The Direct Election of Senators and the Emergence of the Modern Presidency

Introducing the Journal of Historical Political Economy

Over the last year, History Political Economy (HPE) has really taken off. If you're reading this, you have been following Broadstreet, which has been serving -- and building -- the HPE community since August 2020. Recently, my fellow Broadstreet editor, Jared Rubin, and I signed an agreement to edit the Oxford Handbook of Historical Political … Continue reading Introducing the Journal of Historical Political Economy

Rep. James O’Hara (R-NC) and Discrimination in Interstate Travel

When the 45th Congress (1877-79) convened in October 1877, the Republicans found themselves in a vexing political situation. Reconstruction was effectively over. The Democrats controlled the House and all eleven states of the ex-Confederacy, while the GOP maintained a tenuous grip on the Senate and the presidency. Governing power was now divided between the Party … Continue reading Rep. James O’Hara (R-NC) and Discrimination in Interstate Travel

Disputed Elections in the U.S. House

As the 117th Congress begins its work after the tumultuous 2020 election, Democratic leaders in the House and Senate – working with the new Joe Biden administration – face an uncertain political landscape with very slim majorities. While much has been made of the 50-50 split in the Senate, which provides Vice President Kamala Harris … Continue reading Disputed Elections in the U.S. House